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How Much is a Gold Bar Worth?

See example below on how to exactly calculate the worth or value of a gold bar. It's a very simple calculation anyone can do.

Whether you are looking to buy or sell gold bars, the value of a gold bar will be pretty much the same for either of those transactions. The most important question is what size of gold bar are you trying to find the value of?

For example, a one ounce gold bar is going to have a much different gold value than a kilo gold bar will.

How to Value a Gold Bar?

No matter the size of the gold bar, all you have to do is simply find the spot price of gold per ounce and multiple it by the number of ounces your gold bar equals.

So if the current price of gold is $1,500 and you have a one ounce gold bar, then your gold bar is worth around $1,500.

But if you have a ten ounce gold bar, then your gold bar would be worth around $1,500 x 10 ounces = $15,000. That’s a big difference.

Therefore to find out what a gold bar is worth, you essentially need two figures: the weight of the gold bar and the current spot price of gold.

The price of gold updates constantly and is equal to one troy ounce of pure .999 gold. Since almost all gold bars that are sold to the retail public are pure gold (.999), this really simplifies the calculation it takes to figure out a the value of a particular gold bar.

The spot price of gold is very easy to find. Many website publish it “live.”

Popular Gold Bar Weights

Once you have the current price of gold, then you’ll need to know the weight of your gold bar.

Gold bars are mainly sold by the ounce of by the grams. Below is a list of common gold bar sizes and weights in troy ounce. This will allow you to easily calculate the value of a gold bar.

Also, it’s good to know that one gram = .0321 troy ounces.

Common Gold Bar Sizes​ Troy Ounce Value​
1 Gram
0.0321
2 Grams
0.0643
2.5 Grams
0.0804
1/10 oz
0.10
5 Grams
0.1608
1/4 oz
0.25
10 Grams
0.3215
1/2 oz
0.50
20 Grams
0.6431
25 Grams
0.8039
1 oz
1
50 Grams
1.6077
100 Grams
3.2154
5 oz
5
250 Grams
8.0386
10 oz
10
500 Grams
16.0772
1 Kilo
32.15

How to Calculate Gold Bar Values

Using our table above and our example spot gold price of $1,500, let’s looks at some common examples of how to determine a specific gold bar’s value.

Gold Bar Calculation Example 1:
Size: 1 Gram Gold Bar
Calculation: Gold Bar Troy Ounce Weight = .0321 oz x Sample Gold Spot Price of $1,500
Gold Bar Value = $48.15

Gold Bar Calculation Example 2:
Size: 10 Gram Gold Bar
Calculation: Gold Bar Troy Ounce Weight = .3215 oz x Sample Gold Spot Price of $1,500
Gold Bar Value = $482.25

Gold Bar Calculation Example 3:
Size: 1 oz Gold Bar
Calculation: Gold Bar Troy Ounce Weight = 1oz x Sample Gold Spot Price of $1,500
Gold Bar Value = $1,500

Gold Bar Calculation Example 4:
Size: 100 Gram Gold Bar
Calculation: Gold Bar Troy Ounce Weight = 3.2154 oz x Sample Gold Spot Price of $1,500
Gold Bar Value = $4,823.10

Gold Bar Calculation Example 5:
Size: Kilo Gold Bar
Calculation: Gold Bar Troy Ounce Weight = 32.15 oz x Sample Gold Spot Price of $1,500
Gold Bar Value = $48,225

Now that you understand how to calculate the value of common gold bars sizes, you can easily figure out exactly what your gold bar is worth!

Gold Bar Value When Buying and Selling

You now know how to calculate gold bar values. But what I taught you to calculate is the melt value of the gold bar. This means, you understand how to calculate the value of the amount of gold your bar contains.

But is this the price at which you’ll buy or sell your gold bar at? Most likely not. Let me explain.

When you are buying and selling gold bars there is also a premium price to deal with. When you are buying gold bars, typically the premium price is “above spot.” And when you go to sell your gold bar, you’ll likely be quoted a price at or “below spot.” This premium price is how physical bullion dealers make a profit. This is their margin.

To simplify things, you may buy a gold bar at +$20 over spot. So with our sample gold price, you would pay $1,520 for your gold bar. And when you go to sell the gold bar, you might get a quote for -$10 which would equal $1,490.

From this example, you can see the dealer’s margin would be $30 per bar. This is an oversimplified example of how it works. Premium price calculations are much more complicated than that and are constantly changing depending on current supply, demand and cost of physical metal at the time you are looking to buy or sell.

The last thing to mention here is if you are looking to buy gold bars, we recommend pure gold bullion bars that are shipped in assay cards from high volume, reputable gold bullion dealers.

 

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